Thyroid hormones plays very crucial role in our body and the hormones are responsible for our proper metabolism, growth and develop of our body. It can be found infants and children require appropriate amount of thyroid hormones for development of brain. Under or over activation of thyroid hormones can badly affect human body. The major cause of thyroid can be deficiency of vitamin B, iodine, and different other minerals in the body of patient. However, there are also other reasons like hereditary problem of thyroid, exposure to radiation, and harmful chemicals can also be the reasons for imbalance of thyroid hormones in patients’ body.

Imbalance of thyroid can be classified in two categories like hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. When an individual’s body secrets excess of thyroid hormones then the person is suffering from hyperthyroidism. The person having this problem can find more appetite, heart palpitations, increased body heat, bulging eyes, uneasiness, anxiety, inadequate sleep, muscle weakness, severing hands, and low menstrual flow. On the other hand person suffering from hypothyroid complains about frequent tiredness, overweight, depression, unable to tolerate heat or cold, headaches, asthma, allergies, slow recovery from diseases, acne problem, low sex desire, insomnia, irritability, anxiety and panic attacks, decreased memory, inadequate concentration, sometimes infertility, and various other problems.

If we talk about the treatment of thyroid it can be found homeopathy is the best cure for the disease. You can find best homeopathy hospitals in Hyderabad. Vira’s Homeopathy Clinic is the reputed name for thyroid treatment as at our clinic you can get treatments from highly experienced thyroid specialist in Hyderabad. As our treat for thyroid progresses you can find much relief from the disease. Our doctors examine each patient taking care of their age, mental state, previous medical history, and various other aspects to provide proper treatment. Therefore, we are the trusted clinic of thousands of people coming for thyroid treatment in Hyderabad.

Hypothyroidism is a very common condition. It is estimated that 3% to 5% of the population has some form of hypothyroidism. The condition is more common in women than in men, and its incidence increases with age.

Below is a list of some of the common causes of hypothyroidism in adults followed by a discussion of these conditions.

  • Hashimoto’s thyroiditis
  • Lymphocytic thyroiditis (which may occur afterhyperthyroidism)
  • Thyroid destruction (from radioactive iodine or surgery)
  • Pituitary or hypothalamic disease
  • Medications
  • Severe iodine deficiency

Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis

The most common cause of hypothyroidism in the United States is an inherited condition called Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. This condition is named after Dr. Hakaru Hashimoto who first described it in 1912. In this condition, the thyroid gland is usually enlarged (goiter) and has a decreased ability to make thyroid hormones. Hashimoto’s is an autoimmune disease in which the body’s immune system inappropriately attacks the thyroid tissue. In part, this condition is believed to have a genetic basis. This means that the tendency toward developing Hashimoto’s thyroiditis can run in families. Hashimoto’s is 5 to 10 times more common in women than in men. Blood samples drawn from patients with this disease reveal an increased number of antibodies to the enzyme, thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO antibodies). Since the basis for autoimmune diseases may have a common origin, it is not unusual to find that a patient with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis has one or more other autoimmune diseases such as diabetes or pernicious anemia ( B12 deficiency). Hashimoto’s can be identified by detecting anti-TPO antibodies in the blood and/or by performing a thyroid scan.

Lymphocytic thyroiditis following hyperthyroidism

Thyroiditis refers to inflammation of the thyroid gland. When the inflammation is caused by a particular type of white blood cell known as a lymphocyte, the condition is referred to as lymphocytic thyroiditis. This condition is particularly common afterpregnancy and can actually affect up to 8% of women after they deliver. In these cases, there is usually a hyperthyroid phase (in which excessive amounts of thyroid hormone leak out of the inflamed gland), which is followed by a hypothyroid phase that can last for up to six months. The majority of affected women eventually return to a state of normal thyroid function, although there is a possibility of remaining hypothyroid.

Thyroid destruction secondary to radioactive iodine or surgery

Patients who have been treated for a hyperthyroid condition (such as Graves’ disease) and received radioactive iodine may be left with little or no functioning thyroid tissue after treatment. The likelihood of this depends on a number of factors including the dose of iodine given, along with the size and the activity of the thyroid gland. If there is no significant activity of the thyroid gland six months after the radioactive iodine treatment, it is usually assumed that the thyroid will no longer function adequately. The result is hypothyroidism. Similarly, removal of the thyroid gland during surgery will be followed by hypothyroidism.

Pituitary or Hypothalamic disease

If for some reason the pituitary gland or the hypothalamus are unable to signal the thyroid and instruct it to produce thyroid hormones, a decreased level of circulating T4 and T3 may result, even if the thyroid gland itself is normal. If this defect is caused by pituitary disease, the condition is called “secondary hypothyroidism.” If the defect is due to hypothalamic disease, it is called “tertiary hypothyroidism.”

Severe iodine deficiency:

In areas of the world where there is an iodine deficiency in the diet, severe hypothyroidism can be seen in 5% to 15% of the population. Examples of these areas include Zaire, Ecuador, India, and Chile. Severe iodine deficiency is also seen in remote mountain areas such as the Andes and the Himalayas. Since the addition of iodine to table salt and to bread, iodine deficiency is rarely seen in the United States.

A diagnosis of hypothyroidism can be suspected in patients with fatigue, cold intolerance, constipation, and dry, flaky skin. A blood test is needed to confirm the diagnosis.

When hypothyroidism is present, the blood levels of thyroid hormones can be measured directly and are usually decreased. However, in early hypothyroidism, the level of thyroid hormones (T3 and T4) may be normal. Therefore, the main tool for the detection of hyperthyroidism is the measurement of the TSH, the thyroid stimulating hormone. As mentioned earlier, TSH is secreted by the pituitary gland. If a decrease of thyroid hormone occurs, the pituitary gland reacts by producing more TSH and the blood TSH level increases in an attempt to encourage thyroid hormone production. This increase in TSH can actually precede the fall in thyroid hormones by months or years (see the section on Subclinical Hypothyroidism below). Thus, the measurement of TSH should be elevated in cases of hypothyroidism